Standardized examples in this manual
Standardized example mappings in this manual

We use standardized mappings to illustrate processes and workflows in our examples. Wherever we explain an Airlock Gateway mapping configuration, we make use of the following example scenarios.

Simple mapping with failover back-end

Most of our customers use failover setups with independent back-ends hosted on separate machines. This is best practice to ensure high availability, load distribution and uninterrupted maintenance at the same time.

The following illustration shows our generic standard mapping with failover back-end.

Simple mapping with failover (example)
Name
Description
Note
webapp.ext.virtinc.com
Virtual host of the web app or application, which is protected by Airlock Gateway.
Airlock Gateway uses an Apache web server to host virtual hosts.
virtinc
Name of the mapping.
None.
webapp.int.virtinc.com
Name of the back-end group in the Airlock Gateway configuration.
Back-end groups are virtual collections of one or more back-end hosts.
back_end_1
Name of one back-end host of the back-end group.
None.
back_end_2
Name of one back-end host of the back-end group.
None.

Simple mapping without failover

This illustration shows the most simple mapping configuration with only a single back-end host.

We do not recommend using such a setup in real-world environments. However, this minimalistic setup can be very practical for testing environments or explanatory purposes, where failover and redundancy are not important.

Simple mapping without failover (example)
Name
Description
Note
webapp.ext.virtinc.com
Virtual host of the web app or application, which is protected by Airlock Gateway.
Airlock Gateway uses an Apache web server to host virtual hosts.
virtinc
Name of the mapping.
None.
webapp.int.virtinc.com
Name of the back-end group in the Airlock Gateway configuration.
Back-end groups are virtual collections of one or more back-end hosts.
single_back_end
Name of the back-end host in the Airlock Gateway configuration.
None.